THE THREE
WORLDS
TRILOGY
THE THREE WORLDS TRIOLOGY

BOOK TWO - THE NEW WAY

On a small island in the Mediterranean two young
women find themselves witness to a battle for women’s
freedoms and the future of Europe itself…


In this, the second book of The Three Worlds Trilogy, Anne-Marie
Richardson is about to be returned back to her own late-twentieth
century England, following her adventures in the classical era
alternative history ‘probability world’ inhabited by the Amazon-like
warriors known as the Femyny, fantastic creatures from Greek
mythology, and menaced by the Roman-like Latium League.

Instead, however, a seemingly freak accident transports her to yet
another probability world - this time to a sinister castle tower in
Malta, and a politically unfamiliar twentieth century in which history had
apparently taken a different course sometime in the late-eighteenth century.

Even more unexplained and mysterious, her fellow companion is a Bulgarian friend named Miranda Simeonova, and the two women become caught up in a chain of personal relationships and events, as a predominantly matriarchal neo-Gnostic political and religious movement from Africa and the Middle East challenges the entrenched existing regime - first in the Italian Kingdom of Naples, and ultimately the rest of a conservative, male-dominated, Christian Europe…


The second book in the "Three Worlds Trilogy", this continues immediately on from "Centaurs and Amazons". This has yet to be published.

NEW WAY - Originally a neo-Gnostic religious and spiritual revival which had began in Persia or Iran, in the 1920s, by the 1940s the movement had evolved quite distinct social and political objectives as it was developed and refined by its theologians, preachers and intellectuals, increasingly attracting the young, the disillusioned, and the poor and disenfranchised, and especially women. From its purely religious and theological beginning, under a succession of able leaders, thinkers, feminists and strategists, it became political, advocating the nationalisation of foreign assets, banks, oil-wells, plantations, factories, the overthrow of imperialism and the ousting of foreign troops. Throughout the 1950s, 60s and 70s it spread east into Afghanistan and southern Russia, and west into Armenia and Kurdistan and the Greek-Bulgar Empire, then further west and south into Greater Hungry, Syria, Palestine and Egypt. In each country what had began as a fringe religious movement quickly evolved into a political party that - by ruthless efficiency, leadership, organization, missionary zeal and an ever-growing power-base of the middle and working classes, and especially newly enfranchised and educated women - eventually often becoming either the major political power brokers or the actual ruling majority. Once in a position of power, the New Way instigated vast programs of social change, tapping into the newly educated desire for change and democracy, as well as the aspirations of the poor. Slow to respond in any coordinated fashion at first, the European great powers - notably Britain, Hungary, and France - eventually imposed trade embargoes against those ‘liberated’ Middle Eastern and North African countries that have embraced the New Way, who, in turn, now forming a united front as the League of Small Autonomous States. By the 1980s and 90s the New Way, often now in loose coalitions with like-minded progressive or revolutionary movements, had penetrated into Europe, and threatened long-established traditional regimes in Italy, Spain, Ireland, Russia and the Balkans.
From the glossary of "The New Way"
by G. G. Anderson
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