THE THREE
WORLDS
TRILOGY
THE THREE WORLDS TRIOLOGY

BOOK ONE - CENTAURS AND AMAZONS

A routine drive along a motorway west of London
unexpectedly leads to a fantastic adventure in a world
of Amazons and early Romans…


In this, the first book of The Three Worlds Trilogy, Anne-Marie
Richardson, a young Englishwoman from the late twentieth
century, finds herself transported into an alternative history
‘probability world’ sometime in the late Iron Age, but with the
extraordinary difference that in this world many of the creatures
associated with Greek mythology - centaurs, satyrs, unicorns -
actually exist, alongside an Amazon-like matriarchy of women warriors
known as the Femyny, and an early version of the Roman Empire, still
known as the Latium League. Together with Ganya, her mentor and
companion from another probability world far in the future, one of the
mysterious ‘peoples of Gaia’, they find themselves pitched into the
confrontation between matriarchy and patriarchy that was destined
to decide the future history of this other world for centuries, or even
millennia, to come…


Published privately ISBN 978-0-9929365-4-9
Copies are available by contacting doublegee@doublegee2010.co.uk

FEMYNY, THE - The Femyny were an Amazon-like matriarchy descended from the Asiatic Scythians, whose original heartland was on the steppes of modern-day southern Russia or Ukraine, which territory they still regarded as their spiritual and political homeland. Legend has it that the Femyny, under the leadership of their original Founder-Queen, Myrene I, having killed or eliminated their males enemies, gradually extended their territory - initially as a means to defend themselves by waging constant and ruthless war against hostile, male-dominant neighbouring tribes; killing, or later castrating or maiming, the unfortunate men, while ‘liberating’ and recruiting more and more women to their cause. Within several generations under later ‘Great-Queens’ (all named Myrene) their armies spread down the western edge of the Black Sea into Dacia (modern Romania), conquering Thrace (modern Bulgaria), then into the hinterland of Greece and Anatolia (Asia Minor, or modern Turkey). Within three hundred years the ancient states and peoples of Bithynia, Mysia, Lydia, Lycia, Lycaonia, Galatia and the Hellenes (or Greeks) had been conquered, and the Femyny’s original social simplicity gave way to increasing complexity and sophistication, and a confederation of semi-autonomous territories, each under the rule of a High-Queen, residing in her own regional Queen-City. Like the earlier ancient Mycenaeans and Hittites, the Femyny were essentially a military elite ruling over their demilitarised subject peoples, who they called ‘These-Without-Swords’, and using eugenics and male infanticide to create a gender ratio quite disproportionate compared to most other societies, being as much as two-to-one in favour of womanhood. However, the Femyny also brought order, stability, trade, good roads and communications, and developments in art, culture, architecture and philosophy.

LATIUM LEAGUE - By the second-half of the Late Classical Era the origins of the Latini tribes, like that of their neighbours, the Oscan-Umbrian hill peoples and the Sabinio, were lost in the mists of time. What had become the core of the Latium League territories were the fertile, volcanic low hills south of the River Tiber and villages, such as Lavinium or Tusculum or Lanuvium, that eventually, by the early part of the Late Classical Era, had developed into fortified urban centres, the heart of which was the sacred sanctuary of Mons Albanus (Monte Cavo) and the religious and political capital of Alba Longa. Surrounded on all sides by actual or potential enemies, like the Etruscans and Sabini to the north and the Samnites to the south, gradually these quarrelsome, independent-minded city-states were forced to find common interest and a unity of sorts that developed into commercial and political treaties with each other. Those defeated or vanquished were the Oscan-speaking Aequi in the upper Anio valley; the Umbrian-Italic Volsci people on the southern borders; the Samnites, after a series of protracted campaigns and wars; and the lowland Sabines, who eventually were granted Latium citizenship. In the Femyny probability world, although the minor city-state of Roma failed to gain the political dominance it achieved in our own, the increasingly powerful and aggressive League still developed much of the same military structure, expanding east and south, eventually either conquering or incorporating former non-Latin rivals and enemies into what was essentially a military despotism. Although still contained by the now shrunken Etruscan kingdoms and the Gallic tribes to the north, the powerful Latium military turned their attention south and east - to the Hellenic and Messapic settlements about the ‘boot’ of the Italian peninsular, to the Phoenicians in Sicilia and Carthaginian Africa, and across the Adriatic, to Illyria.

From the glossary of "Centaurs and Amazons" and "The Nizza Affair".
by G. G. Anderson
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