THE THREE
WORLDS
TRILOGY
&
THE ANNE-MARIE
CHRONICLES
by G. G. Anderson
HOME I ABOUT I BOOK ONE I BOOK TWO I BOOK THREE I BOOK FOUR I BOOK FIVE I BOOK SIX I THE AUTHOR I SHOP I CONTACT ME
Copyright © 2015 web design by Acorn Design & Print
 
ABOUT THE THREE WORLDS TRILOGY
and THE ANNE-MARIE CHRONICLES
The six books that make up The Three Worlds Trilogy and The
Anne-Marie Chronicles follow the adventures of the same female
central character, Anne-Marie Richardson, in three quite different
alternative history worlds, where the common theme is the
existence of either an established matriarchy (for example the
'Femyny' in Centaurs and Amazons) or a matriarchy, or quasi-
matriarchy, in the making.

This is science fiction, with strong female characters and
an underlining feminine theme. It is good old-fashioned
character-driven story-telling with a liberal sprinkling of sex
and romance, mixed with suspense, mystery and adventure.

The various alternative history worlds portrayed here (especially
those of The New Way and In the Grand Duchy of Wessex) are
not particularly fantastic. Rather they are depicted realistically,
with characters who evolve and change as the story progresses.

The world we live in is full of darkness and nastiness. Anyone can get that by watching the television news or reading the newspapers. Women everywhere are still fighting for equality and rights, and not just in Islamic countries, but from India to China, to France and America. Repression, misogyny and hatred are all too real, every day, across the planet. I acknowledged this, but wanted to create more optimistic alternative worlds. There is still danger, and there are enemies a-plenty, while the threat of the patriarchy is never far away, but there are also hope, love and optimism.

There are numerous plot twists and unexpected revelations, with characters from previous books re-appearing (often seemingly 'unimportant' characters take on hitherto unsuspected significance), while new characters appear, develop, interact. A prevalent theme is that nothing is quite what it seems, and this goes especially for characters. I would defy any reader to say they could ‘see the end coming’.